When exactly is 'enough actually enough'?

At what point do we realise that the present cannot continue to be the present any longer, and a different present (or an alternative future) needs to be created in its place?

When exactly is 'enough actually enough'?

The saying 'enough is enough' has become some-what of a modern day moot point.

Outraged individuals are constantly shouting out that 'enough is enough' only for enough to simply keep on being...well,..enough.

At what point do we realise that the present cannot continue to be the present  any longer, and a different present (or an alternative future) needs to be   created in its place?

As much as we might search for it, there is unfortunately no magical line in time up to which we travel, at which point it suddenly becomes apparent that an alternative future needs to urgently be sought.

So far and no further is a tripwire that, for the most part, exists only in our minds.

It happens when our irritation with the status quo reaches a certain threshold where we cannot see ourselves happily carrying on with the way things are, and realising that an intervention is needed to change things for the better.

Locating when 'enough is actually enough' in time.
Locating when 'enough is actually enough' in time.

The gift of 'enough is enough'

'Enough is enough' is really a very valuable point in time and a crucial line in the sand for inviting change into our institutions and lives.

It is the inflection point at which people muster up enough motivation and courage to call for a change; the point where they are then willing to forgo the safety of what they know and explore an alternative future.

All too often though the saying is used as an idol threat by somebody who feels frustrated by the present, but is unwilling / or unable to follow through with the daunting task of creating a different future.

'Enough is enough' needs to be re-elevated in status as a rallying cry. It's true meaning should recaptured by society and by those who are bold enough to use it.

I dare you - use it in a meeting, in a conference, in a conversation, in a public announcement recorded on some kind of media channel...and then qualify its meaningfulness with a change action.

We simply cannot carry on undermining this radical call for change like we currently do.