The DTC trend has been strengthening in popularity for some time.

Generally it has always been considered a viable route-to-market for smaller brands, and those looking for innovative ways to build a relationship directly with their customers.

But now even big companies like Frito Lay are now encouraging you to buy your snacks directly from them.

What does this trend mean for the future of retailers when just about every FMCG brand is heading towards being a vertically integrated retailer themselves?

Pepsi and Frito-Lay want you to buy all these snacks online with their new DTC websites
Snacks.com lets you buy Frito-Lay brands such as Tostitos, Cheetos, and Ruffles—as well as dips, crackers, and nuts—online.

Image via The New York Times

Continuing our theme of 'protest branding' food outlets in Hong Kong are not allowing residents to forget about the ongoing campaign of social unrest that the city has been embarking on.

Tear gas ice cream tastes like tear gas and serves as a reminder that the fight continues after the pandemic lockdowns are eased.

Opinion | Tear-Gas Gelato, Foulmouthed Mooncakes and Other Foods Fit for a Revolution
How the Hong Kong democracy movement feeds on the city’s distinct identity.

In a move that was considered by many fashion snobs to be unthinkable just a few months ago - the Covid-19 crisis along with the retail apocalypse in the USA has opened up a massive high-fashion opportunity for Amazon.

Yes, Common Threads: Vogue x Amazon Fashion, is a digital storefront for alumni of theVogue/CFDA Fashion Fund competition and means that luxury has finally succumbed to the commodified utility of e-commerce.

Karl Lagerfeld will be turning in his grave.

Can Amazon Save Luxury Fashion?
The online megastore has never cracked high fashion’s resistance. As retail plummets and the pandemic rages on, is now the time?